Foster an Author Week 3 Starts Tomorrow!

FA3 2017

21314865_10213730750893170_4896655066236516071_nIt’s time for Foster an Author 3

Tomorrow is the start of Foster an Author Week and it’s my third time participating. So what is Foster an Author? Jo and Isa from Jo & Isa Loves Books and Read Review Repeat Blog & Literary Promotions have organised this fantastic annual event as a way to help highlight new authors to readers.

Who am I hosting?

This year, my authors in focus will be K.A. Duggsy and Lexi C. Foss. K.A. Duggsy is based in Cardiff, Wales and writes sci-fi/time travel/dystopian romance. And what about Lexi C. Foss? Lexi is based in Atlanta, Georgia, writes contemporary and paranormal romance and is the author of the Immortal Curse series and the Mershano Empire series. Make sure you check in every day either here or on the Kim Talks Books Facebook page to get to know more about both authors!

Follow them!

To get things started before tomorrow, make sure you follow both authors and familiarise yourself with their work. Let your one-click finger go crazy if it strikes your fancy! The most important thing is to give new-to-you authors a try!

FOLLOW K.A. DUGGSY

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FOLLOW LEXI C. FOSS

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Happy reading and see you tomorrow for more of Foster an Author 3.

 

 

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Review: End of the World by Nesly Clerge

Screen Shot 2017-06-12 at 15.52.22Imagine a future where you are always connected and there is no need for TV or printed books or even the internet as we know it–the chip inside you knows everything, keeps track of your finances and even orders taxis for you. It knows when you need to order groceries, it knows when you are unwell. It knows *everything*–except what you’re thinking. This is the world scientist Gayle Conyers lives inhabits in Nesly Clerge’s End of the World: The Beginning with her two daughters and nanny/home help. In this world, those who are chipped are privileged. Those who are not are hunted down by the Order and “reformed” (or made into food a la Soylent Green, depending on who you ask).

Gayle is, for the most part, perfectly happy in this world. She likes her job, she doesn’t really question much the way things are, though she wishes she had more resources for her research into HIVm, a mutation of the HIV virus. After watching a debate between Dr. Armstrong, a renowned, agnostic scientist who claims he’s made a scientific breakthrough in successfully transplanting the brain intact to another body, and Dr. Kingsley who believes that the end of the world is coming and is being brought on by those in power (and those who are chipped) who are unwittingly worshipping at the altar of Lucifer when they think they are the enlightened ones. The next day, Gayle is contacted by Dr. Armstrong, who makes her an offer she cannot refuse. And then she is contacted by a rebel called Michael who wants her to spy on Dr. Armstrong and find out everything she can about his research.

Not a lot happens in the story–there are long discussions about religion and science with the rebels on the side of religion trying to convince Gayle that everything she knows and believes in is wrong or is part of a plan to deceive her and others–and this is what ultimately lead to a 3-star rating from me. I think the story has potential, but I wanted more of Gayle discovering whatever is the truth on her own rather than having two (actually three, counting Kingsley) men constantly telling her what they believe in and assuming she will bend to whatever it is that they’ve deemed the truth.

Since End of the World is billed as a sci-fi thriller, I was expecting more excitement and more things to happen. I also wanted Gayle to be more proactive in the story. And while I like the premise of the story, I felt like the religious aspects of it ended up taking up way too much of the story and bogging it down.

What worked for me was Gayle’s growing distrust of being under constant surveillance through the chip implanted in her and through the nanny who acts as a caregiver to her children. The more she learns (through Armstrong and Michael), the more she does not trust KATE (the system that watches over everyone and everything), but she must keep up a facade. I also liked how Gayle doesn’t feel she can trust any of the men trying to convince her to join their side–no matter which side seems to be more “right”.

End of the World is an interesting novel, but–if you’re looking for an action-packed story, it’s probably not the story for you. If you are interested in religion and discussions of good versus evil, then you’ll probably be pulled into the story. This is the first book in a series, so be forewarned that there is a cliffhanger-style ending.

My rating? 3 stars

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A new take on a fairy tale: Marissa Meyer’s Cinder is a page-turner

ImageAs much as I love stories about dystopian societies, it’s not very often that I read them. Then I saw the cover for Cinder and I was intrigued. I asked around and then one of the staff at Science Fiction Bokhandeln in Gamla Stan told me he was convinced I ought to read it. He’d read an advance copy and was hooked. Needless to say, I was even more intrigued. And I have to say–he wasn’t wrong.

Cinder is based on the fairytale, Cinderella. Instead of being set a long time ago in a far away land, Cinder takes place in New Beijing, the capital city of Eastern Commonwealth, after World War IV. Cinder is a cyborg and, because of her non-human status, she is seen as a second-class citizen. She has no rights and is considered the property of her legal guardian, Adri, and her daughters, Peony and Pearl. She earns money for the family through her work as a mechanic at a stall in the local marketplace. One day, the Crown Prince of the Eastern Commonwealth, Prince Kai, shows up at Cinder’s market stall and asks if she can repair his android. Later, when Cinder’s step-sister, Peony, contracts the plague, which has claimed thousands of victims in New Beijing and for which there is no cure, Cinder’s guardian blames Cinder and “volunteers” her for research. From that point forward, Cinder and Prince Kai become intertwined–by the threat of war and by a forbidden attraction.

Though Cinder is YA fiction, it is a novel that will appeal to people of all ages. It’s a real page-turner that is full of intrigues and just enough romance to keep you hooked. I finished reading Cinder last night and I’m already longing for the next book in the series. So if you like your sci-fi with a fairy tale twist and a dash of romance, you need to read Cinder. You won’t be disappointed.